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as solicitor general. nine years ago, they ruled 5 to 4 to uphold the university of michigan law schools limited use of affirmative action. and coming up next on c-span, oral arguments from last week's opening session of the courts full term. this case asks whether courts have jurisdiction to hear lawsuits and forge human rights abuses that occurred out -- for human rights abuses that occurred outside the country. this is an hour. >> we'll hear argument first this term in case 10-1491, kiobel v. royal dutch petroleum. mr. hoffman? >> mr. chief justice, and may it please the court, the plaintiffs in this case received asylum in the united states because of the human rights violations alleged in the complaint. they sued the defendants for their role in these human rights violations in u.s. general personal jurisdiction of our courts. abouts nothing unusual suing a tortfeasor in our -- >> may i ask you about the statement you just made? personal jurisdiction was raised as a defense, right? >> personal jurisdiction was raised as an affirmative defense, but not raised in a motion to dismiss.
identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as supervisors, what if anything would you propose to strength the city's ethics laws. i will start with mr. davis. >> strong ethic laws are essential. what is happening with our sunshine task force and hope davis can speak to this since she recently served on the task force. these need to be strengthened and one problem we have is around enforcement. i would like to see more of the ethical violations of larger committees, some of which are operating, for instance, in some shady areas of law. one was the run he ed run, the committee for mayor ed lee last year and the campaigns that aren't swaying the politics of city, the way the run ed run campaign did. so i think that is one the issues and improving our good government and ethic laws in san francisco. >> miss breed, would you like to address the question? do you want me to repeat it? >> yes. >> sure. a recent chief civil grand jury report, at the request of supervisor campos the city conducted a comparison of laws identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as su
the uc davis school of law in 2004, following a clerkship with judge cal braise of the united states court of appeals for the second circuit. interest include election law, administrative law, statutory interpretation, constitutional law and property and natural resources law. he is a resident of san francisco's mission district. we are honored to work chris almendorf. [ applause ] >> thank you very much and thank you to all of the candidates who are here today. we're very fortunate to be joined by six candidates and what i hope will soon be seven. all of the candidates have agreed to ask their supporters to be respectful of other candidates and the audience and to maintain quiet during the forum. i ask you to respect that commitment. every aspect of this forum will be equally fair to all participating candidates. as everyone here knows candidate debates are often limited to latitudinal appears and personal attack. our debate focuses on critical areas of policy disagreement among the leading candidates. so this end the league of women voters of san francisco and the san francisco pu
suppression. we're told this is a return to the jim crow laws. well, frankly 80 percent of americans support the total idea pools. the thomas is a high percentage for any issue, even high and another that your humble pie because people are estranged and some people. chieftains of hispanics and african-americans support photo id. in fact, rasmussen asked, they believe and for a is a serious issue? 63 percent of whites said yes and 64 percent of african-americans said gm's. african americans in some places live where a machine controls the political left that the live under. frankly it allows the crime rates to skyrocket. the biggest victim of flow from is minority reformers and veterinarians were political machines control the destiny in the can't fight city of. the mayor of detroit who until recently was serving in public housing after conviction for crimes, he won his second term in part because of a flood of fraudulent ballots. the city clerk cluster job after that. abilene were asking for another florist, a town we could extend free finlandia's to anyone. i believe it's a small number. in
, a discussion about google operations and antitrust laws. >> almost 20 years ago, we broadcast one of the most controversial stories in our 44 years on the air. it was called yes, but is it art? i was accused of being a philistia, someone lacking the esthetic ability to appreciate contemporary art. in those 20 years, works that i question worth hundreds of thousands of dollars are now worth hundreds of millions. >> what made everybody so that 20 years ago? >> i discovered something that i had absolutely could barely believe -- that when you question someone's taste in art, thanmore personal politics, religion, sexual preference. it is something that goes to the very soul when you say you b ought that? > sunday at 8:00 on c-span's q&a. now, an american enterprise institute panel discussion examining whether google is violating antitrust laws. topics included the market for internet search, and an analysis of google's business model. pedal trade commission chairman john leibovitz has said that the ftc plans to make a decision on whether to take legal action against google by the end of this year
. there were people in legal law firm conference rom, they could get an internet connection. people in starbucks where they could get an internet connection. people working at the kitchen tables around town. and all of a sudden, right around april 1st. bestart moving to the headquarter. this is literally six week aways from the announcement. and this just this big space. bigger than the room. far bigger than the room. three or four times of the size of the room. it was a whole floor of the high-rise building in chicago, and it was just kind of remarkable. we didn't have everybody in. we were slowly bringing people in. literally we were still getting the servers up. we had telephones ringing and people try to answer phone calls. we had e-mail coming in to our e-mail address. we didn't have a system to receive e nail a real way that you would want. we had many coming many. we didn't have budgets. and we had, you know, we had constituency leaders calling our political department because they wanted to have time with the candidate, we had our fundraisers, who had to raise money with the
't prosper without rule of law. because that is ectly our main focus, in the sense that we are not prosecuting drugs by drugs themselves. we are looking for rule of law in mexico. we want a country in which the law prevails. otherwise it will be impossible to prosper or to have a fair society. >> rose: we continue talking about google ventures with kevin rose and bill maris. >> we're investing in teams and people more than products at the early stages. so you're looking for larry and certificate guy as they were starting out they are what made google different from lycos and the other search engines. >> rose: we con chrood with the photography of brigitte lacombe. >> she asked would we be interested in doing something similar for london olympic on women in sport. and of course, i mean, it was just like a great opportunity because i mean for me andlso for my sister to discover the new world, i know nothing about sports. and it was very intriguing. >> rose: yes. >> and so of course we said yes. >> rose: felipe calderon, bill regard maris, kevin rose and brigitte lacombe when
at this this morning. alabama also has virtually the identical stand your ground law that florida has, so do you know that the officer ms case can probably say he was he felt that he was in danger of his life and he was standing his ground and shooting. i'm betting as this proceeds, you may see that law that we've heard so much about rear itsingly head now in alabama. >> that is really interesting to note. now, cnn, paul, spoke with the victim's mother in this case. she is, understandably, in shock. when things do settle down for her, would she have any legal recourse against the school? >> well, it's hard to say. obviously if her son was heavily intoxicated and was trying to attack a police officer, that's going to be a -- that's going to be a tough case to win. however, these campuses have alcohol problems. virtually every campus in america today has problems with intoxicated kids, and they have to develop policies to deal with it. now, this particular university, by the way, is a dry campus. you're not allowed to drink at this campus, even if you're over 21. i noticed from some local news reports
is playing, i think the biggest role in city could play would be to make compliance with existing laws and regulations more clear and more easy for local residents. london, for example, is doing a great job of this in anticipation of the olympics. they have run out of hotel rooms, and they realize that the whole purpose of the olympics was to create economic development in some of the most underserved areas of the city, and they are not getting that. we will be working collaborative lee to come up with a solution to solve that problem. they have created a wonderful website that clearly states what you need to do to be compliant. >> that is what christopher is doing in london then, right? >> yes. >> one more question for jay, and i think we should open up for questions from everyone here. tell us what existing city initiatives -- you know, this -- the schering economy working group will interface with or connect with, and how does it fit in with existing strategic goals and plans of the city? >> i think our director of environment in our city has issued a goal for 2020, being mission --
as a community service, i host a radio and tv program called "folk law for ordinary folk," it's a very tough one in the sense that workers at some point are essentially giving up higher salary and higher pay in exchange for those pension benefits. so to come back later on and essentially cut that out from under them, the question is one of fairness and of equity. that being said, as far as police and firefighters, obviously those are public safety areas and it's a little bit different in the sense that we definitely need to protect those pensions in a different manner than we do others. as far as other ways to save, i would certainly look at capping pensions moving forward, so that they don't increase incrementally over time. i think we need to put a cap on that now before it starts to burgeon and get out of control. >> thank you. >> miss olague. >> i believe i was one of the individuals who answered no. i don't think we should balance the budget on the back of the workforce, and there was prop c. prop b was the adachi measure and proper c was a lot of pension reform where the unions and the
federal prosecutor paul butler who is now a law professor at georgetown law school. thank you for being here. >> thank you. >> we've all heard that audio of jerry sandusky speaking with the college radio station. were you surprised to hear he called in and made a statement like that? >> you know, it was a little surprising. but he's done things like this before. he gave that weird interview with bob costas shortly before the trial. this is consistent. from a defense perspective, it's a horrible move. i think he added a good 10 to 20 years to his sentence, because he's blaming these people. what judges want to hear in a sentencing hearing is remorse. i was convicted, the process was fair, now i'm going to do my time. that might reduce the sentence. but this is not -- making it worse for him. >> the tone of it, basically saying i was wrongfully convicted of these disgusting acts, i think he said disgusting. he's also expected to speak today. might we hear more of the same or do you think perhaps the lawyers have said, might want to change up the conversation a little bit in court today? >
are your thoughts? >> caller: i just think it's unfortunate that today we need this kind of law we. look at the ayaan to leave the unemployment rate on its higher among black and it is white, so there's still discrimination going on in this country, and we still need this law. it's really unfortunate. >> host: will be in jacksonville florida, independent. your thoughts are next, willie. >> caller: yes, good morning. it must not be enough highly educated black institutions say i have to go to harvard to get a certain education. we don't have -- we reached the same criteria. we are still lacking and i get an education at the school. i just don't understand. they have no qualified school that is on the same level with these schools and professors on the same level. uc-irvine saying? >> host: here is the 28 president of the university of texas at austin writing in today's wall street journal traer. he writes history repeats itself when they are in an ironic way the university of texas goes before the supreme court to defend the missions. it lasted 62 years ago when he men's white and african
prominent women who had abortions when they were illegal to repeal our abortion laws. nearly 15 years before anita hill's fame mouse testimony. to our ground beaking reporting that defined genital mutilation as an international crime against women. to our 1996 look inside the taliban's regime before most of the media had even noticed right up to our 2011 story declaring rape is rape in which we revealed the f.b.i.'s 80-year-old definition of rape under counted rapes in this country by hundreds of thousands every year. that was part of a larger feminist campaign and kicked off a fire storm resulting in 140,000 e-mails and letters to the f.b.i. and attorney general demanding the definition be changed. it was, we succeeded. mrs. mrs. mrs. has always been ahead of the main stream news when it comes to coverage of women and girls. "ms." first sounded the alarm about the war on women eight years ago. behind me you'll recognize the cover of "ms.," wonder woman fighting for peace and justice. for our 40th anniversary we wanted to feature this iconic super hero with women marching to stop the attacks
rule of law, no longer the best. we still have a work ethic bear. if you're going to invest one place in this planet, it would be here. so we've got to get beyond. we don't have the divine right to success. we got to get immigration rights, fiscal policy right, otherwise it's another gift call shale oil. my god, the most profligate energy nation the planet. kaaba tenants that i know you miss it all that energy. were going to give you one more shot. let's hope you do this one right. so we have a problem. we should diagnose the problem. if you look at america today, why are we going to 2%? this one i can't prove. but i believe that europe isn't going to sink us, but there's a huge wet blanket out here in the wet blanket to name resolving uncertainty, real insurgency on taxes, policies, fiscal cliff. we have this constant business, not just a minute, the regulatory bee gees. i travel around america. wherever i go come businesspeople are faced terrible. we've done it to ourselves, folks. get rid of that wet blanket and it will take off. there's a great article that someone reprinted in "t
's unconstitutional to be -- to bar women from combat because it denies them equal protection under the law. >> host: now, you also wrote a novel -- >> guest: i did. >> host: called "sand queen," what is this? >> guest: i'm writing a cycle on the iraq war, fiction and non-fiction combined. it's a woman in iraq at the very beginning of the war, guarding the first and biggest prisoner of war camp we set up over there, and it goes back and forth between her story, her experience as a woman soldier, and the story of an iraqi civilian woman. they meet at a check point, and they begin to interact. in is based on things that my soldiers had experienced, and that you get to see the war from both the iraqi and american point of view, but told through the eyes of women which is a rare way to tell stories of war. >> host: when you look back at the media coverage of the iraq war and currently the afghanistan war, do you feel it's been fair? do you think it's been comprehensive? >> guest: it depends which nation's media you're asking about. >> host: u.s.. >> guest: i think we did a very bad job at the beginning
.s. laws. it is likely to become fodder for the u.s. presidential campaign, and there was a big piece -- >> on "60 minutes" and "wall street journal" and chavez won. >> apparently this is just a rumor, the bls the entire of bureau labor statistics from here was flown down to venezuela to monitor the election. >> the chicago guys were thrown down. >> ba-dum-boom. let's get to the story, the venezuelan president hugo chavez as joe was just saying -- >> 54-45. >> comfortable election victory that could extend his rule to 20 years. the next election isn't officially for six years but you had tens of thousands of ecstatic supporters flooding the streets around the presidential palace in downtown caracas, pumped their fists in the air and started shouting chavez's name. enrique capriles, he was beat by more than nine points. it will extend a wave of nationalizations and continue his support for left wing allies. we've heard how important this is for cuba, he has billions at his fingertips because of the oil produced there. this is the country we think has the biggest oil reserves in the wor
the law they're not allowed to report exit poll bus they believe a social media campaign will begin sunday afternoon to try to draw momentum. hugo chavez clearly said he believes the opposition will try and drive that and he said anyone who does that will be punished. but it was, as i say, true to form. true chavez, cracking jokes throughout, and looking quite healthy, really, despite what has been a very terrible year for hum in trying to battle cancer. paula newton, cnn, caracas. >>> from sean conry to daniel craig, who is your favorite bond? we'll share bond moments and bond trivia you may not already know. a speed bump! [ wife ] a beached whale! awn clippings! a mattress. a sausage link. mermaid. honey!? driftwood. come on, you gotta help us out here a little. [ male announcer ] febreze eliminates odors and leaves carpets fresh. ♪ [ male announcer ] febreze. eliminates odors and leaves carpets fresh. ♪ >>> welcome back to "early start weekend." from dr. know to quantum of solace, from sean connery to daniel craig, james bond has been entertaining moviegoers from around the world fo
, they wrote into the south where was segregated and they refuse to follow the laws. they were very brave. so i have a character, a young man who was on that bus. and his mother says system, those people are going to kill you. and he discovers that she is right, they really do want to kill him. i'm sure many people in the audience will remember that in the younger people will have heard of it anyway. tremendously dramatic. and i found out about this stuff, it's still moving. encourage the people who had studied the notion that if you are attacked, unjustly attacked, the best thing to do is to do nothing. some of these people just, you know, stood there were laid bare and took the punches and kicks. i have found it is strictly moving to read about this stuff. and i'm hoping that i will be able to, you know, bring that to millions of people. >> in some ways, that is like the lloyd george thing. they show what it really is. >> that's exactly right. that was their theory. and it's a good theory. but what i have had the guts to do that? i don't think so. >> doing something about something strongly i
countries to reunite almost all european continents. freedom, democracy. rule of law and respect for human rights are the ones that people all over the world aspire to. >> but the e.u. has won the peace prize in the midst of an acute financial crisis which has led to violent demonstrations in greece and spain. in europe, all divisions are reopening. perhaps that's why the european -- the nobel committee wants to boost it, prevent it from fragmenting. >> well, it's turned up a lot of discussion. we'll be going to the self-appointed capital of the e.u., brussels in a moment. first of all, we're going to catch you up on other stories making headlines around the world. idea's winner of the nobel prize for literature says he hoping the compatriot who won two years ago would soon be freed as he was jailed in 2009 and serving an 11-year sentence for inciting subversion of to the power. >> and the president's mohammed to remove the country's top prosecutor. as a farce, the president's move follows an angry public response to the acquittal of a group of supporters of the outgoing regime. reducing t
. >> this is your fox news minute. this year's nobel peace prize law goes to an individual but to the 27 nation european union. european commission president jose mayor well borebossow was honored. for fostering peace on a continent that years ago was ravaged by war and now challenged by financial crisis. a minnesota woman filed the first lawsuit against the manufacturer of contaminated steroids used to treat back pain. the injections are responsible for inspecting 14,000 patients with meningitis and caused 14 deaths. space shuttle endeavor started its journey through los angeles early this morning on the way to its new home at the california science museum. the shuttle is crawling at 2 miles an hour on a two day journey from lax airport to the museum and that is your fox news minute. dagen: two miles an hour is classic 405. that is how fast connell mcshane drives. not saying anything about him. >> assuming he knows how to drive a car. connell: thanks. dagen: the bailout on the stock market. investors pull out over $10 billion from u.s. stock mutual funds in the past week. $100 billion so far t
into law to deal with the nation's rising debt load -- the fiscal commission not, came up with a plan, and it essentially went nowhere because they did not get enough votes from the panel to spark the next stage with these legislative actions. so, a group of six senators started meeting privately, sometimes in secret, to try to see if there was something big to do with this framework. these are very big political and policy decisions. they are very complex. they take a lot of political will at a time when congress does not seem to have that kind of will. these six, perhaps they could come up with something. they have been meeting for two years. they added two members. we could go through the list. the republican side -- senator sexy chambliss, senator mike crapo, -- senator chambliss, senator mike crapo, tom coburn of oklahoma, and and and the democratic side is mark warner, kent conrad, durbin of illinois, who is the number two democrat, and a since added to the list, senator michael bennett from colorado, who is a newer, younger member who is part of the generation that does not und
's against the law. that's what we're getting. we are getting fancy footwork, not be all that pressure to get a deal that only the president of the united states can oppose. >> perhaps the house chairman of the budget committee, who could be a heartbeat away from the presidency, also could have been against the sequester. but, in fact, he was a. and effect spoke out in support of it. >> we have other issues to get you as well but wait a minute, aren't you like jim lehrer? [laughter] spent i'm not going to comment on that. [laughter] >> we do have other issues to get to, and i know that people will want to ask about issues like asia, trade, russia, things like that but let's go to the audience now. we have microphones around the room. please raise your hand if you'd like to be recognized. stager name and affiliation. make sure you're asking a question rather than a long statement, please. the lady right here. >> my name is megan. my question is for mr. verma. you sit in the beginning of your statement that al qaeda has been decimated them and you also said that, at the picture exact words, but
. >> translator: yes, love happens. that's fine. but in this society, they've done something wrong. the law allows it. society doesn't. >> reporter: back at the shelter, the couple knows they've put their family through a lot. but they say they have no regrets. we wouldn't have been killed had it not been for the love commandos. even though they don't know what's next, they're happy to be alive and together. cnn, new delhi. >>> we have live pictures for you now, this is roswell, ynew mexico, as felix baumgartner is getting into this capsule and he is going to start the ascent. the estimated time is 1:40 for launch. he'll go 23 miles up and then jump. what we know is that he's been working for seven years to beat this record. it was held by colonel joe kitinger in 1960. 52 years ago, he jumped from 1002 feet up. this time will be 120,000 feet. imagine if you're on a jetliner and you're flying cross-country. you're at about 35,000 to 40,000 feet. he's going up to 120,000. he'll get out it to the end of the capsule and he will jump wearing his pressurized suit, wears about 100 pounds. and he will fl
as a vegetable on school lunch menus. they wrote a lot of the health care reform law. thurber estimates $9 billion is spent every year on lobbying and related advocacy, a top lobbyist can make millions the influence of business in washington d.c. is the third largest business after government and tourism. i think there's probably 100,000 people in the industry, not lobbyists specifically but in the industry supporting all of that in washington. >> reporter: and what do clients expect from their lobbyists? we asked gary lauer, ceo of a $150 million california firm called e-health insurance, a website that lets customers shop for health insurance from 180 companies. >> i was interested in getting some lobbyists, a, who had high credibility and, b, who could frankly get some doors open so we could explain what the situation was and what we think the remedy would be. >> reporter: specifically he was seeking to change the rules of health care reform so low-income americans can use government subsidies to buy insurance througcompanies like e-health. lobbyist lanny davis agreed to represent e hea
to the department of legislative services. and with independent audits required by law... question seven means millions for maryland schools. guaranteed. new eppsodes of two shows tonight.candace went to os angeles and met with the stars for a sneak peek.it all starts wiih bbnns at 8pm. 3 &pbones at 8pm.it all starts with bones at 8pp. 3nats nats tonight's episode is called "the tiger in the tale".the team investigates the murder of an animal expo employee.in the process they ssumbll into the world of illeeal animal &ptrafficking.this is tte eight seassn of the show and one of the stars tells me ii's nice fans anddthe network. &ptamara says: remember the first couple of seasons that i was on, i was sort of hoping it comes back... hoping it gees renewed. not sure whats ghoing to happee so so tte end of every seaosn you are sorta phitt knuclling it and its really nice to know hat relationship that we have and like you said there is this incredible support 3 3 you can catch n aal nnw bones" tonight at and then t 9-pmmyou can catch an all new "mob doccor" doctor" 3nats: nats: & thiss how fe
it was signed into law. >> i reject the argument that thoation of us who oppose it -- those of us who oppose it are bigotry or hateful. it's not any of that but we love god and we have a responsibility to stand up for what is right. >> same-sex marriage supporters are also standing up. baltimore ravens linebacker brendan bodasia is the latest big name to support the law. he says a yes vote is a vote for equality in the state and across the country. the same-sex marriage referendum will appear as question six on the ballot. early voting in maryland begins october 27. tuesday october 16 is the deadline to register to vote in maryland. >>> it is 5:06. good morning if you're just waking up. time for the first your money report. >> earnings season now under way on wall street. so far so good i'm happy to report. the aluminum company alcoa kicked things off saying profits and revenue beat wall street expectations last quarter. they are also predicting a good year ahead and the parent company of kfc, pizza hut and taco bell also reporting better than expected profits and it's raising its earnings o
law enforcement agencies. they claim, at least, that huawei may be in violation of certain laws. we'll see. again there is a great deal of conjecture in today's report but you you need to sort of connect the dots to really get to the final conclusion that says, hey, these guys are really bad guys. that being said, it's a huge issue between the united states and china. not that we don't have many of them. we also talked to chairman rogers about that as well this morning. they are, as we all know, one of the largest holders of our debt. they are one of our largest trading partners. but this is an issue that many feel need to be elevated to that same level of importance when we talk to chinese leaders. >> david, thank you so much. bob, down to you. >>> there are several big american tech companies who are watching this showdown very closely with china. tech correspondent jon fortt in silicon valley looking at which companies stand to win and lose in all this. >> bob, the biggest, most obvious winner here is cisco because that's huawei's arch enemy in the networking space. cisco has acc
in the heart of london which is not even governed by the laws of england, the queen of england has to have special permission to go in there. that is the banking center in the world. there is no limit to the rehab provocation of collateral. that means they are manufacturing money out of medicare. that is why we have a two quadrillion derivative debt in the world. a america is only $16 trillion in the debt. the whole world is bankrupt because of that. what about their debt? congress to bail them out last time because they threaten to have martial law in the streets. host: we are going to go to a tweet. do you think the american dream has been downsized? that is the story -- that is the question this morning. we are watching to see the republican numbers come out. they plan to send their numbers of very sen. here is what about mitt romney. -- here is one about mitt romney. some other news stories from the campaign trail. expectations run high ahead of the single chance to face off. they go head to head this week. c-span will bring that to you live. we have live coverage of the campaign 2012
every dime we used to rescue the banks, and we passed a law, to the end taxpayer-funded wall street bailouts permanently. we passed health care reform, also known as obamacare, because i do care. i do not want insurance companies, jerking you around anymore. i do not suit him -- do not want somebody without health care because they have a pre-existing condition. we repealed "don't ask, don't tell," as i promised him we would. today, he no outstanding soldier, marine, sailor, here man -- airman, none of them will be kicked out of the military because of who they are and who they love. when you think about ohio, and when governor romney said that we should let the auto industry go bankrupt -- we said, we are not going to take your advice. do not boo. vote. we reinvented a diving auto industry that supplies one in eight ohio jobs and has come roaring back to the top of the world. four years after the worst economic crisis of our lifetimes, our businesses have created more than 5 million new jobs. friday, we found out the unemployment rate has fallen from as high as 10% to as low as 7.8
're entitled to the equal protection of the laws. >> bit way, the one to watch in this case is justice anthony kennedy. today he had very tough questions for both sides. >> bill: we will. thank you. shannon breen with the supreme court. >>> it's the part of your car you never think about until you need it. now a warning that thousands of air bags in cars across the country could be fake and they may not protect new a crash. plus, millions of cars were called. ahead, what's behind the problem here and how to know whether or not it affects your car. that's all coming up tonight on the fox report. >> bill: you might be driving a car with a defective air bag. that's the warning today from federal safety regulators. they say people had replaced their air bags in the past three years may have gotten a fake instead. rick leventhal live in our news room in new york city. how in the world did this happen, rick? >> apparently people will counterfeit almost anything these days. this warning affects a small percentage of vehicles and seatbelts are still a driver's primary protection. but this is an extrem
they or their parents pay state taxes. opponents say the law would be a financial burden on the state. they collected signatures to force the issue on to the november ballot. a recent poll of more than 800 registered voters found that 58% support the measure and 34% oppose it. >> hundreds of volunteers were hard at work in baltimore saturday for the annual day of service. the annual ricky myers day of service is run by the non-profit civic works, the 10th year for the event. volunteers helped plant gardens, clean up parks and sort through donated goods. >> the main focus of our day and focus of ricky myers life was to celebrate volunteerism and that's what makes a day like today when 400 of us get together really special. >> since its inception, close to 30,000 people have volunteered with civic works. >> a good day for it yesterday. time right now, 9:08. 51 degrees at the airport. a little later, if you'd like to keep more of your pennsylvania check, we have tips to help you hang on to hard earned cash for the upcoming tax season. >> bees have been producing honey in the shades of blue and green. >>
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 78 (some duplicates have been removed)